Continuous Delivery – a Safety Net will make you Lazy

I sincerely believe that some kind of safety net is needed when coding.

In fact I believe that having a safety net is especially important when doing continuous delivery.

Before I managed to blog on my opinions regarding this, I read Scott Berkun’s book The Year Without Pants in which Scott makes quite the opposite argument based on his experience from Automattic (and contrary to his experience from Microsoft).

A Safety Net will make you Lazy

Essentially, Scott backs up Automattic’s belief in the philosophy: safeguards don’t make you safe; they make you lazy. This may to a certain extend be true in some cases, as some people drive faster when they get ABS brakes, and football players take more risks because of their padding. And on the same token, if you find yourself in a high tower with no railing, you will be very cautious about every step you take as a fall would kill you. And since you are very cautious, it is unlikely that you will be killed.

Does this philosophy work in software development? Should we skip manual and automatic testing as well as other kinds of verification before we deploy the latest changes to the Live system? Should we essentially skip the entire safety net and rely on developers being very cautious?

No!

Being cautious only takes you part of the way. And if you are too cautious, there will be much needed changes to the code that you will never dare do. Besides, even cautiously made changes could have unexpected effects, regressions, on other parts of the code. If you are too cautious, your code will rot and eventually become unmanageable. (There is a brilliant description of code rot and how to avoid it in Robert C Martin’s book Clean Code)

Still, in a perfect world, coding without a safety net could actually work. In theory it’s simple, and I have already blogged about it. First of all, all changes to code must be small, additive increments – baby steps. Secondly, the code must be crafted by rigorously following the SOLID principles. With a perfect code base with low coupling and high coherence, most baby step changes would consist of adding new code that plug in without changing existing code, or would be a few simple changes to a single existing class, in either case the impact on the system would be restricted and well understood.

Alas, the world is not perfect, neither is the code base that most developers work on.

Besides, sometimes you need to do a refactoring that will impact quite a bit of functionality. Sometimes you change a single or a few lines of code, but there is no simple way to fully understand its impact. In both cases the risk of regressions can be lowered with rigorous verification.

Building a Safety Net

I am quite happy that I read Scott’s book, as it made me think a bit deeper about building up a safety net. (And I can certainly recommend the book to anyone interested in the process of developing software.) Note that what I mention here is regarding the part of the safety net that developers must build and maintain.

Here is my opinion:

  1. Build and maintain automatic tests for non-trivial functionality.
  2. Do not build tests for trivial, unimportant or easily verified functionality.

The second bullet is based on my experience that often huge amounts of tests are made, but the maintenance burden is so high that the tests are not maintained, new tests are not written and (unit) testing in general gets a bad reputation among developers. In such a case, needed refactoring is generally avoided and the code will rot. For these reasons, it is good practice to avoid tests that would only reveal bugs of low severity, of which many would be found anyway, simply with a quick glance at the system.

So the trick is to have exactly the tests that make sense and ensure that they are maintainable.

Even then, a safety net could make a developer lazy. It is never an option to simply throw the code over the fence to the Testing Department, effectively making buggy code somebody else’s problem. Rather, developers must build up a safety net as an integral part of developing code.

Being cautious and having a safety net is the way to go.

Why do some Developers Prefer not to have a Safety Net?

As a final note I have a possible explanation to why Automattic developers prefer working without a safety net.

Scott explains how he once went to India and climbed the stone tower of Jantar Mantar. There was no railing and a fall would kill anyone. But people were cautious because of the lack of safety measures.

I also climbed the stone tower of Jantar Mantar years ago when I was much younger. I clearly remember looking down at our hilarious guide at the ground, but I do not particularly remember the missing railing.

Could it be that focus on safety measures increases with age and experience?

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